Sama Vritti

SAMA VRITTI

Sama Vritti: Equal or uniform movement

Sama Vritti stimulates the Parasympathetic nervous system which is responsible for rest and relax, the opposite of our Sympathetic nervous system which triggers flight and fight. Our rate of respiration is controlled by the Medulla, part of the primal brain which controls basic functions such as heart rate and survival. If we are continually feeling stressed or threatened our heart rate and breathing rate increases preparing us for fight or flight. Taking control of the breath steps in to break the pattern, reducing heart and breath rate inducing rest and relax.

Sama Vritti
Sama Vritti

Method

Stage 1:

Sitting comfortably bring your awareness to the flow of your breath at the tip of the nose. Practice until you are comfortably able to bring your attention to your breath.

Stage 2:

Now begin to count the breath with your purpose to make it equal. Find a count that is comfortable and does not cause strain. Start with a count of three or four for every inhale and every exhale, you may adjust the number to suit you. The breath must be comfortable, and with practice you will be able to extend the breath within your comfortable limits.

As you practice you will notice a natural pause at the top of the inhale and the bottom of the exhale, this is quite natural so allow this to happen.

Stage 3:

Continue and gradually increase the length of the inhale and the exhale.

SAMAVETA

Samaveta: Both nostrils together

Samaveta begins the practice of breath retention which has various benefits. The mind, or Manas, is activated by Prana, or the breath. When practicing breath retention, the activity in the mind (Chitta) falls away, and the mind becomes still. At the time of retention, the amount of oxygen taken up by the blood and the amount of carbon dioxide which is discharged by the blood is increased. Samaveta also prepares the lungs for more advanced practices such as Nadi Shodhana

Sitting comfortably bring your awareness to the flow of your breath at the tip of the nose. Practice until you are comfortably able to bring your attention to your breath.

Keep the action as rhythmical as possible, experiencing a wave like motion from the abdomen to the chest with the inhale and as you exhale from the chest into the abdomen. Do not strain but breathe as deeply as possible expelling and inhaling as completely as you can.

Now begin Pranayama Samaveta: at the end of the inhale hold the breath for a second or two without straining. Then breathe out, exhale as completely as possible without straining. One round.

Slowly increase the time of retention up to a maximum of 10 seconds. Do not force or strain.

Benefits: Prepares the lungs for more advanced practices. At the time of retention, the amount of oxygen taken up by the blood and the amount of carbon dioxide which is discharged by the blood is increased.

Martin Thompson